Garage Insulation R Value
Written by Barrier Insulation Inc

Asbestos Insulation Removal

Asbestos removal may become an issue when a material contyaining asbestos is damaged, crumbling or flaking in your home. Read on to learn more about what to do and the costs associated with the removal of asbestos.

Asbestos was used very widely in building materials before the start of the 1970’s. In reality it is actually a carcinogen but can often be found in older buildings among pipe and duct ventilation, vermiculite attic insulation, wall and ceiling acoustic tiles, cement floor tiles and siding as well as floor tile adhesives.

However it is wise that is the asbestos containing materials are in your home are undamaged, leave them alone. According to the Environmental Protection Agency it is far more dangerous to disturb them. In fact in the majority of states you must disclose if asbestos is in your home prior to its sale. But if you are planning a remodel, removing the asbestos will be the best thing you can do if you are going to disturb it in any way.

Asbestos Removal Basics

The first thing to do is to have the material you suspect containing asbestos tested and then have it professionally removed.

  • Speak with the asbestos program in your region as well as the asbestos administrative department in the state where the property is or you can contact OSHA (Occupational Safety & Health Administration) regional office to establish the local regulations and requirements for your area.
  • Find accreited asbestos contractors and inspectors who are trained and licenced in the testing and removal of safe asbestos.
  • Conflict of interest can be avoided by having suspect materials tested by a certain company and the removal completed by a different company.
  • Preparation is key. It may be the case you and your family will have to move out of your house on a temporary basis while the asbestos is being removed from the property.

Getting A Contractor

There is nothing infra dig about using a flooring, siding or roofing contractor for this as long as they are trained and well practices in the removal of asbestos. Before the commencement of work, you will want to ensure you have a written contract clearly expressing the local, state and federal regulations the contractor is obliged to follow including the clean up of your premises and the disposal of the asbestos. At the end of the job, get written evidence from the contractor that the above procedures were completed correctly. Have a licensed asbestos inspector perform a follow-up check as a final step.

Asbestos Removal Costs

An initial inspecton for asbestos costs an average of $600 with prices ranging from $400 to $800 for the US in 2019.

Asbestos removal costs do vary depending on how much needs to be removed. But you can expect an average minimum fee of $2,250 with averages varying on the low to high end at between $1,500 and $3,000.

Total asbestos removal in a home measuring 1,500 square feet with asbestos in the floors, walls, ceilings, pipes and roof averages $25,000 with costs ranging from $20,000 to $30,000 for the US in 2019.

Barrier Insulation Offers Garage Insulation Services In Phoenix.

Barrier Insulation Inc. is provider of top-quality insulation in Phoenix, including blow in insulation, spray foam insulation, rolled batt insulation and more. Trust your insulation installation to the professionals at Barrier Insulation Inc. knowing your house will be optimized with the finest quality insulation in the marketplace.

If you are building a new home, or probably just need to remove the old insulation and install new more energy efficient insulation. We proudly offer the valley’s more comprehensive insulation service that helps you save on energy stay comfortable. Give us a call at 602-499-2922 or 623-931-0637.

Garage Insulation R Value
Written by webtechs

What R-Value of Insulation to Use for a Garage?

A lot of people usually don’t think of insulating their garage when they are insulating their house but doing so goes a long way in reducing energy costs for the whole house as it offers an additional buffer.

Insulating the Garage

When you have a room built over a garage, it becomes vital to insulate the ceiling of the garage to avoid the heated area above it from losing its heat. When you insulate your garage, use insulation with the exact same rated R-value as that was installed in your home’s ceiling and walls.

While insulating your garage won’t make it essentially warmer unless you include a heater, it will help to provide additional insulated space for the home. A great deal of people enter and exit the home through their garage, the additional insulation will help make the car start easier in the morning. Use the same insulation to insulate the garage that was used for the exterior walls of the home. If the walls and ceiling are closed in, think of using a loose fill type of insulation, as this type of insulation uses a machine to push the insulation where it needs to go through a hole in the sheetrock. Insulate the garage’s ceiling by using the suggested R-value for your area as advised by the Department of Energy.

Exterior Walls

If your exterior walls were constructed from 2-by-4 inch studs, the maximum insulation that can be installed into the wall while keeping its R-value is R-13 or R-15 as these are each made to fit a recess at a depth of 3 1/2 inches. Because insulation fits the width and depth of the recess between studs, when you condense insulation to fit the space, you take away its insulating properties — the trapped air between the fibers.

Ceilings

When you have a room over your garage, its floor rests on boards supported by joists. If the joists are 10 inches deep, the recess can take high-density R-30 insulation, which is 8 1/2 inches thick, more than adequate enough for floor insulation. If the rafters are open to the garage, (boards that support the roof) use R-38 insulation between the them at the roof, if they are at a depth of 10 inches. To add additional insulation inside the garage, using sheetrock install a ceiling and allow access to the space between the new ceiling and the roof. This allows you to add the required insulation. While some ceilings in the southwestern part of the United States require a minimum of R-19 insulation, most attics or ceiling areas require a minimum of R-38 in the ceiling.

Garage Door Insulation

Use specialized foil-backed blanket insulation to fit the inside of your garage door. A lot of garage-door insulation has an R-value between R-8 and R-12, because it is thin enough to fit the space. This will add insulation to the garage door without hindering its functionality. Another option is purchasing a pre-insulated garage door that might have a higher R-value. If you insulate the garage without insulating the garage door will allow any heat collected in the room to escape through the door.

Best Way to Insulate Garages

When insulating your garage, it’s up to you to determine what type of insulation material works best for your garage.

Your overall goals and expectations and what they are will help you choose the insulation that works best in your situation. If you need a conditioned space that will keep cold air out of your home or extra room, a material that creates an air barrier will benefit you most.

Cellulose and fiberglass insulation don’t provide the kind of air barrier you are looking for in this scenario, so a foam insulation is a better alternative.

Barrier Insulation Offers Garage Insulation Services In Phoenix.

Barrier Insulation Inc. is provider of top-quality insulation in Phoenix, including blow in insulation, spray foam insulation, rolled batt insulation and more. Trust your insulation installation to the professionals at Barrier Insulation Inc. knowing your house will be optimized with the finest quality insulation in the marketplace.

If you are building a new home, or probably just need to remove the old insulation and install new more energy efficient insulation. We proudly offer the valley’s more comprehensive insulation service that helps you save on energy stay comfortable. Give us a call at 602-499-2922 or 623-931-0637.